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Monday, 23 November 2020

The Fairy Godmother Part 92


“You’re awake,” said Velvet smiling.

“Just about,” I replied.

“Enid told me that you were out of the coma, but when I came yesterday they said you were tired,” Velvet explained.

“I nipped out for a while to try and find out what Enid was up to,” I explained. “It took more out of me than I thought it would.”

“And what had she been up to?” Velvet asked.

“After visiting Maud I think she went to see Ivy, though I could be wrong about that,” I replied. “As to what she’s been up to, your guess is as good as mine.”

“Have you asked her?” asked Velvet.

“I tried, but I think that was when all the dashing about got to me,” I sighed. “She brought me back here.”

“Did you tell the Doctors what you had been up to?” asked Velvet.

“No, they’d have only told me not to,” Myrtle explained.

“And why do you think that?” asked the Doctor.

“Because I’ve been in a coma for a while and you can’t expect to just get up and carry on as before?” Myrtle guessed.

“So why did you?” the Doctor replied.

“I wasn’t gone long,” Myrtle replied.

“You knew you shouldn’t, but you still did. Do I have to talk to the Head of the Fairy Godmothers to make sure you can’t do that again or will you at least check with us before you do anything like that again?” he asked.

“OK, I’ll ask you first,” Myrtle said.

“Good, because if I have to escalate this I will,” he replied, looking at the chart at the end of my bed. “And how are we feeling this morning?” he asked. “And I want the truth, not what you think I want to hear.”

“I feel a bit washed out,” Myrtle replied. “But you look OK.”

“And you know why you feel washed out,” the Doctor replied, blushing slightly.

“And why would that be?” asked Enid, picking up the chart at the end of the bed and trying to look as if she knew anything about what was written on it.

“She overdid things yesterday trying to find out what you were up to,” snapped the Doctor. “Things would have been easier for her if you had answered your phone.”

“And who do you think you are telling me what to do?” Enid snapped back at the Doctor.

“I am the one who is trying to keep your daughter alive,” he replied. “And you aren’t making that job any easier.”

“I don’t think this is the right place for you two to be arguing,” said Velvet. “You are tiring Myrtle out just watching you.”

“I think it is time for all your visitors to leave so that you can have a rest,” said the Doctor, looking from Velvet to Enid.

“And what about you?” asked Enid.

“I am looking after my patient,” he replied.

“We’ll be back later,” said Velvet, taking Enid by the arm.

“Very well,” said Enid.

“Don’t do anything I wouldn’t do,” said Myrtle.

“You aren’t doing much at the moment,” said Enid.

“You know what I mean,” Myrtle replied, closing her eyes.

“All right,” said Enid, giving her wand a quick flick and taking Velvet back to her laundry.

“Don’t you know how much that girl worries about you?” Velvet snapped.

“Worries about me or about what I am doing?” asked Enid.

“Both I would think,” said Velvet. “You do have a tendency to act first and think about it later, usually when Myrtle has told you what you’ve done wrong.”

“So what do you suggest, I should check things out with Myrtle first?” asked Enid.

“It would stop her worrying about what you might be doing,” Velvet suggested.

“Then she just has to worry about what I am doing,” said Enid.

“You said it,” Velvet replied. After all, you do want her to get better.”

“Of course I do, what sort of Mother do you think I am!” Enid snapped.

“I don’t think you want me to answer that one,” said Velvet. “I think you need to consider Myrtle first for a change.”

Enid scowled and waved her wand.

“I hope I haven’t made things worse,” muttered Velvet.

“I doubt it,” said one of her helpers. “But I think I have,” she added handing a gown to Velvet. “There’s a stain on it, I tried to clean it off, but it’s spread and gone florescent!”

“Give it here,” said Velvet taking the garment. “This is one of those stains which is easy to get rid of, if you know how.”

“But I don’t know how,” sighed the young helper.

“You are here to learn,” Velvet replied leading her back into the laundry.



“So you’re Ivy’s daughter,” said Enid appearing next to a woman hiding behind a tree in the park watching as the investigator took Edward away.

“And you must be my Aunty Enid, ex Head of the Fairy Godmothers,” she replied. “By the way, I do have a name.”

“Your Mother didn’t bother telling me what it was,” said Enid.

“Did you ask her?”

“Can’t remember, it was the first I’d heard that she had a daughter,” Enid replied.

“Well the name is Natasha,” she replied. “Nat for short. God knows where she got it from.”

“That is our Mother’s name,” said Enid.

“The only person I can think of called Natasha is that interior designer,” said Nat. “And I can’t imagine Mum being any sort of relative of hers.”

“Yes well, she’s your Mother’s Mother,” said Enid.

“Yes, well I’m sure you didn’t drop by just to introduce yourself,” Nat replied, trying to look hard.

“No, I came here to ask why you conspired with that low life,” Enid looked towards the car taking Edward away. “To nearly kill my daughter.”

“Your daughter?” Nat asked.

“Myrtle,” Enid replied.

“Does that mean she’s my cousin?” Nat asked.

“Yes, though I don’t think she’s all that impressed with cousins at the moment, what with your brother and you,” said Enid.

“I didn’t know,” Nat muttered. “He said it was someone who mucked up his latest get rich scheme.”

“And that’s enough for you to kill someone?” asked Enid.

“I didn’t know it would have that effect,” Nat replied. “And anyway, she isn’t dead.”

“No thanks to you,” snapped Enid.

“All I did was move the stuff from site to site,” Nat insisted. “Edward was the one who decided what it was and what went in it.”

“Thank-you,” said the investigator, stepping out of the shadows and arresting Nat. “That should be enough to put her and Edward away.”

“Good,” said Enid.

“How could you!” shouted Nat.

“You nearly killed my daughter,” said Enid.

“But I’m your niece,” Nat pleaded.

“Not a very nice niece,” said the investigator.

“No,” Enid agreed and watched as they got into the car. “Now I’d better go and tell Myrtle what I’ve done before someone else does.”


By Janice Nye © 2020


Saturday, 14 November 2020

The Fairy Godmother Part 91


“Voice mail,” I muttered as my Mother failed to answer her phone on the third attempt. I sent a text.


HELLO MUM, MAUD HAS BEEN ROUND AND GIVEN THE DISCS TO THE INVESTIGATOR. HE’S GONE OFF NOW, IT WOULD BE NICE TO HEAR FROM YOU. MYRTLE


There was a whirl and there stood Enid.

“So, did he get anything from the discs?” Enid asked.

“I told him one of them was Edward, he was running that course that Ivy took her son to,” I replied.

“Him,” muttered Enid.

“What do you know about him?” I asked.

“Only that he is a con man and nasty with it,” said Enid. “I hope you didn’t do anything to upset him.”

“I took Ivy and her son out of the course he was running and said he was a con man,” I said. “But that was all.”

“All! It was enough! There are those who say he organised for someone to come to a very nasty end because they splashed his new shoes, but don’t tell anyone I said that,” said Enid looking round the room and only stopping short of checking under the cushions because that would be silly.

“The investigator has gone off after him,” I said.

“A lot of people have done that, but they have a lot of problems finding him,” Enid replied.

“Ethel put his whereabouts on the investigator’s phone, if he moves the directions change, till he finds him,” I said.

“I’d better check up on Ethel, God knows what Edward’ll do to her if he finds out,” Enid replied.

“I’m coming with you,” I said catching hold of her hand just before she waved her wand.

“Myrtle!” stuttered Ethel.

“You!” said Edward, standing at the door to the office of the Fairy Godmother.

“Enid, stop him,” I snapped and for once she did as she was told and froze Edward.

“So this is where you are,” said the investigator putting the handcuffs on one wrist and then finding out that the person he was about to arrest was frozen. “I’d like an explanation,” he said looking at the three of us, on at a time. “Myrtle,” he smiled looking at me. “You should be in hospital.”

“I thought Ethel might be in danger from him,” I said pointing at Edward.

“Why?” the investigator asked.

“She helped you find him,” I replied.

“And a very good job you did,” he said to Ethel.

“And you?” he asked turning to Enid. “I have been wanting to talk to you all day, but you haven’t been answering my texts.”

“Texts,” said Enid. “I had one from Myrtle, but I don’t know about any others.”

“She’s not got the hang of her phone yet,” said Ethel. “The messages that come up do tend to confuse her. It’s a miracle that she picked up Myrtles text. She has been known to hit the delete button instead of read. I have been trying to teacher her, but.”

“A work in progress,” said the investigator.

“Something like that,” said Ethel.

“The phone has been making some odd noises today,” said Enid. “I came to ask Ethel what it was all about.”

“I see,” sighed the investigator. “Could someone unfreeze him so that I can arrest him?”

“Of course,” said Enid with a quick wave of her wand.

“What!” said Edward as the second handcuff was put on.

“You are coming with me,” said the investigator, putting a hand on Edwards shoulder, then the two if them vanished.

“Are you OK?” Myrtle asked Ethel.

“I am now,” she replied. “Though I don’t know what would have happened if you two hadn’t turned up.”

“Us and the investigator,” smiled Myrtle.

“Yes, it is a good job he turned up,” Ethel agreed.

“I suppose he does have his purposes,” Enid agreed reluctantly.

“So, what have you been doing?” Myrtle asked Enid.

“Me?” Enid replied trying to look innocent, but failing.

“Yes, you,” Myrtle replied.

“If you don’t mind,” said Ethel. “I have a lot of work to do.”

“We shall leave you in peace,” said Myrtle, taking her Mother by the arm and heading for the office door.

“Thank-you,” said Ethel as the door closed behind them.

“So Mum, what have you been up to?” Myrtle asked again.

“I went to see Maud,” Enid began.

“I know that,” said Myrtle. “She came round to the hospital with some discs for the investigator. What did you do after that?”

“What makes you think I did anything?” asked Enid.

“One there is a gap of time between leaving Maud and me seeing you again, two, you didn’t tell Maud where you were going,” Myrtle replied.

“She would have told you and the investigator might have heard,” said Enid. “You can never tell when they are going to appear.”

“Three, if you didn’t want to risk the investigator finding out, then you are hiding something and four I know you,” said Myrtle. “So spill, where did you go and what did you do?”

“When did you learn to be so suspicious?” asked Enid.

“When I started working with you,” Myrtle replied.

“Nice to know that you learnt something from me,” Enid smiled.

“Stop procrastinating and answer the question,” said Myrtle. “Or I shall go back in the office and ask Ethel to tell me.”

“I went to see Ivy and her son,” Enid replied.

“That wasn’t that hard,” Myrtle smiled. “Why did you go, I know you weren’t swopping knitting patterns, so what did you have to talk about.”

“Ivy has a daughter, as well as a son,” said Enid.

“Was she the other person in the video?” asked Myrtle.

“How did you guess?” asked Enid.

“There was something familiar about her,” Myrtle replied. “She looked a bit like Ivy, but younger.”

“I went to ask Ivy about her,” said Enid.

“Was she the one who told Ivy about the course?” Myrtle asked.

“Yes,” said Enid. “She was a bit suspicious at the time, there has been a lot of bad blood between the two of them, but Ivy thought that they’d got over their differences.”

“Doesn’t look like it,” I replied, mentally adding another relative to the family tree. “What’s her name?”

“Good question,” said Enid. “I’ll have to ask Ivy next time I see her.”

“Right, then I shan’t hold my breath,” Myrtle replied.

“So the family aren’t good at communication,” said Enid.

“Tell me something I didn’t know,” said Myrtle sitting down suddenly on the floor.

“What did you do that for?” asked Enid.

“I feel dizzy,” said Myrtle, struggling to keep sat up.

“You need to be back in your hospital bed,” said Enid waving her wand quickly and getting them both back. The Doctor walked in a moment after Enid had got Myrtle back in her bed.

“The nurse said you weren’t here,” he said looking at Myrtle.

“I don’t remember seeing a nurse,” Myrtle replied sounding a little vague.

“How are we feeling?” he asked checking Myrtle’s pulse.

“A bit dizzy,” said Myrtle.

“Your pulse is a bit on the high side,” he said. “We’d better put you on a monitor and I think it is time your Mother left, don’t want you being worn out by too much excitement.”

“I’d better go,” Enid smiled.

“You haven’t told me about your visit to Aunty Ivy,” Myrtle said.

“I think we can catch up on family gossip next time your Mother visits,” said the Doctor addressing no one in particular.

“He’s right,” said Enid. “It’s nothing that can’t wait.”

“I wont forget,” said Myrtle as Enid disappeared.

“Is she always like that?” asked the Doctor.

“No, she’s usually much worse,” said Myrtle closing her eyes.


By Janice Nye © 2020



Wednesday, 11 November 2020

The Fairy Godmother Part 90


“Maud!” said Myrtle as soon as she saw her.

“I’m so sorry,” said Maud.

“For what?” asked Myrtle.

“The sandwich and,” she started and then sobbed. “When I think of,” she stopped and sobbed again.

“I should have realised that you hadn’t sent them,” said Myrtle, pointing to the chair next to her bed. “You would have come with them to check up on me.”

“Yes, but,” Maud sobbed.

“And you are?” asked the investigator, suddenly standing at the end of Myrtle’s bed.

“This is the investigator,” said Myrtle. “I have asked his name, but he says it isn’t relevant, which does leave a lot of options.”

“I am Maud, I run the canteen,” she replied.

“This would be the one that the sandwich and hot chocolate came from?” the investigator asked. Maud sobbed.

“The canteen that was the last on the list of places that the sandwich and hot chocolate came through,” Myrtle corrected him. “And even if it was the place they came from, it doesn’t mean that Maud had anything to do with them.”

“I didn’t say she did,” said the investigator.

“But you implied it,” Myrtle replied.

“Can you prove that she didn’t?” he asked and Maud’s sobs increased.

“I know Maud and if I had been thinking I would have realised that they hadn’t come from her, she would have brought them and they wouldn’t have had so much garlic in them,” replied Myrtle.

“Garlic! Was that in the hot chocolate as well?” the investigator asked.

“I thought it was just an after taste from the sandwich, at first,” said Maud. “But it got stronger.”

“I shall have to look into that,” said the investigator.

“I would never add garlic to hot chocolate!” said Maud.

“I’m glad to hear it,” said the investigator.

“Enid asked my to bring some discs to you,” said Maud. “There were a couple of strangers in the canteen before,” she paused.

“Have you seen them since?” asked the investigator.

“No,” said Maud.

“And the discs?” he asked.

“CCTV footage of them,” said Maud.

“If you wouldn’t mind pointing them out?” asked the investigator, pulling a player out from his brief case. “If you would tell me if you recognise them,” he added to Myrtle, whilst he put the disc in the machine and then let Maud find them.

“There they are,” she said when she finally found the footage of them walking into the canteen.

“That is Edward,” said Myrtle.

“Edward?” asked the investigator.

“My Aunt Ivy and her son went on a course recently, I forget what the title of it was, but it was supposed to improve the way the behaved with others,” said Myrtle.

“And he was on this course?” asked the investigator.

“He was running it, only it was a great big con. A bit like a get rich quick scheme, only he’s the one who’s getting rich,” Myrtle explained.

“That Edward,” said the investigator. “This has been most useful,” he added putting everything, including the discs into his brief case. “I shall let you know what the results of this are,” he added and left.

“Enid said something about him,” said Maud a couple of minutes after he had left.

“I’d like to ask what she’s up to, at the moment, but I get the feeling that it wouldn’t be a good idea,” Myrtle smiled looking at the door.

“She just asked me to bring the discs here for him and then she was gone,” said Maud. “I couldn’t tell you what she was up to even if I wanted to.”

“So, how’s the canteen been?” Myrtle asked. “I’m surprised that you could find the time to come here, you’re usually very busy.”

“I haven’t had the heart to open up, not since,” Maud sobbed.

“That is such a shame,” said Myrtle. “I hope you will be back open when I get out of here. I’m so looking forward to eating there.”

“I’ll open the day you come out,” said Maud. “But I’m never going to do fried mushrooms again.”

“Oh, but it’s one of my favourites,” said Myrtle.

“If you trust me to make them,” said Maud.

“Of course I do,” Myrtle laughed.

“It is so good to hear you,” said Maud. “When I think of what could have happened.”

“Then don’t think about it, because it didn’t,” Myrtle told her.

“That’s what your Mother said,” Maud smiled.

“Then for once we agree,” Myrtle smiled. “You would never put poison into anything you cook, you just couldn’t do it. Someone used you to get me.”

“Yes,” said the investigator. “We know him and he has a long history of this sort of behaviour.”

“So why haven’t you arrested him?” asked Maud.

“Unfortunately, we don’t know where he is,” the investigator replied. “He has gone into hiding and we have no way of tracking him.”

“I think Ethel could probably find him,” said Myrtle. “I’ll give her a ring.”

“Thank-you,” said the investigator. “It would be good to have the Fairy Godmother’s on our side.”

“We are always on the side of right,” said Myrtle as Ethel answered the phone.

“Myrtle, is that you!” Ethel asked.

“It is me,” Myrtle smiled.

“Thank God you are OK,” said Ethel.

“Thank God and our wonderful health service,” Myrtle replied. “I was wondering if you could do something for me.”

“Anything, it’s just so good to hear your voice,” Ethel burbled.

“The investigator needs to find Edward,” Myrtle replied. “Maud has some CCTV footage from the time and he was in the canteen, but they never saw him afterwards.”

“Edward,” muttered Ethel. “I presume the investigator wants to know where he is?”

“Yes,” smiled Myrtle.

“I can send the location to his phone, if that will help,” said Ethel.

“She can send the location to your phone,” Myrtle told the investigator.

“That would be good of her,” said the investigator.

“Send it,” Myrtle told Ethel.

“He’s there now?” the investigator asked.

“Yes and if he moves it will move with him,” Ethel explained.

“It will give his current location, so it will change if he moves,” Myrtle explained to the investigator.

“Very useful,” said the investigator. “I must be off to do my work.”

“Good luck,” said Myrtle and Maud.

“Has he gone?” asked Ethel.

“Yes,” said Myrtle. “Is there something you wanted to say that you didn’t want him to hear?”

“No,” said Ethel. “I was just wondering if you knew where Enid was.”

“No,” said Myrtle. “But I suspect that she is trying to avoid the investigator.”

“Why would she do that?” asked Maud.

“Good question,” said Myrtle. “You know what she’s like, she never gives a straight answer to anything, especially when she can come up with an evasive one. I think she’s up to something, but I don’t know what.”

“If she comes to the canteen, I’ll tell her what’s happened,” said Myrtle.

“I expect to see that canteen open and serving fried mushroom sandwiches,” said Maud.

“Meanwhile I shall try ringing her, texting her and if that doesn’t work I shall wave my wand and go to wherever she is,” said Myrtle.

“No you wont,” said the nurse, confiscating the wand.

“I’ll contact her,” said Ethel and hung up.

“Take care of yourself and don’t worry about Enid, she can look after herself,” Maud smiled. “I shall leave you to get better and go clean the canteen, I have let things go a bit since you’ve been in here.”

“I should think it was spotless to start off with, so it wont take long to get it back to that,” smiled Myrtle waving as Maud left the room.

“Right Mum,” Myrtle muttered to herself. “I want a word with you.”



By Janice Nye © 2020




Saturday, 31 October 2020

The Fairy Godmother Part 89


“You want to know if anything was sent to Myrtle’s rooms shortly before you went there and found her unconscious?” Ethel asked.

“Yes,” said Enid.

“You know I’m not supposed to tell you what is sent in or out of anyone’s rooms, except your own,” said Ethel.

“Myrtle has spent the last six weeks in hospital in a coma and it could be because of something she ate that was sent to her rooms,” Enid replied patiently.

“The investigator will,” Ethel started to say.

“In six weeks the investigator hadn’t looked into that possibility, he doesn’t sound as if he believes it happened and isn’t prepared to look into it,” Enid replied.

“That is if it happened,” said Ethel.

“Myrtle says that a fried mushroom sandwich appeared, with a message from Maud, followed afterwards by a mug of hot chocolate and that when she had finished them they disappeared,” Enid explained slowly. “The investigator doesn’t believe her, but I do.”

“Maud doesn’t tend to send food to people’s rooms, not unaccompanied,” said Ethel.

“Which probably means that someone else sent them,” said Enid.

“And they pretended to be Maud?” asked Ethel.

“Some people are not very honest,” Enid replied.

“And you want to find out who they are?” asked Ethel.

“Of course I do,” snapped Enid. “They could have killed Myrtle,” she added and started to sob.

“Are you alright?” asked Ethel looking round for some inspiration as to what to do, she saw a box of tissues and handed them to her.

“My daughter could have died,” she sobbed.

“I’ll have a look through the records,” said Ethel, not sure what else to say. “Two deliveries and a collection,” she muttered.

“And where did they come from?” asked Enid.

“That could take a bit of time to find out,” Ethel replied.

“Why?” asked Enid, trying to keep her temper under control.

“It looks as if it came from Maud,” said Ethel.

“But?” asked Enid.

“The signal didn’t originate from there, it was bounced in from elsewhere,” Ethel replied, hoping that Enid would understand.

“So someone sent the mushroom sandwich to Maud’s kitchen and then on to Myrtle?” asked Enid.

“It looks like it has bounced several times,” Ethel replied.

“So you have to follow the bounces back to find out where the mushroom sandwich came from?” asked Enid.

“That’s right,” said Ethel trying not to heave a sigh of relief.

“And the collection?” Enid asked. “Did that go out via an equally torturous route?”

“No,” said Ethel.

“Can it be traced?” asked Enid.

“Can what be traced?” asked the investigator, the sound of his voice made both Enid and Ethel jump.

“The plate that the mushroom sandwich was on and the mug that the hot chocolate was in,” said Ethel.

“Alleged mushroom sandwich and hot chocolate,” the investigator corrected her.

“If Myrtle says she had a mushroom sandwich and some hot chocolate, then I believe her,” snapped Enid. “There is no alleging about it.”

“To be accurate,” said the investigator. “The alleging is in the origins of the sandwich and beverage rather than it’s presence in the rooms.”

“If we locate the plate and mug there may be residue of what was in them that put Myrtle into a coma,” said Ethel.

“Yes,” agreed the investigator. “Then again, it has been six weeks, there may be nothing left.”

“But if we send them to your lab, they can see what is or is not on them,” said Ethel.

“That would be helpful,” said the investigator. “But it may not tell us where they came from,” he added as his phone rang.

“What is it?” he asked.

“A bag with a dirty plate and mug has arrived in the lab, with a label on it saying for your attention,” he was told.

“That will be it,” said Ethel.

“Thank-you,” the investigator replied. “I’d better get over there. If there is anything else you find.”

The Fairy Godmother Part 89


“You want to know if anything was sent to Myrtle’s rooms shortly before you went there and found her unconscious?” Ethel asked.

“Yes,” said Enid.

“You know I’m not supposed to tell you what is sent in or out of anyone’s rooms, except your own,” said Ethel.

“Myrtle has spent the last six weeks in hospital in a coma and it could be because of something she ate that was sent to her rooms,” Enid replied patiently.

“The investigator will,” Ethel started to say.

“In six weeks the investigator hadn’t looked into that possibility, he doesn’t sound as if he believes it happened and isn’t prepared to look into it,” Enid replied.

“That is if it happened,” said Ethel.

“Myrtle says that a fried mushroom sandwich appeared, with a message from Maud, followed afterwards by a mug of hot chocolate and that when she had finished them they disappeared,” Enid explained slowly. “The investigator doesn’t believe her, but I do.”

“Maud doesn’t tend to send food to people’s rooms, not unaccompanied,” said Ethel.

“Which probably means that someone else sent them,” said Enid.

“And they pretended to be Maud?” asked Ethel.

“Some people are not very honest,” Enid replied.

“And you want to find out who they are?” asked Ethel.

“Of course I do,” snapped Enid. “They could have killed Myrtle,” she added and started to sob.

“Are you alright?” asked Ethel looking round for some inspiration as to what to do, she saw a box of tissues and handed them to her.

“My daughter could have died,” she sobbed.

“I’ll have a look through the records,” said Ethel, not sure what else to say. “Two deliveries and a collection,” she muttered.

“And where did they come from?” asked Enid.

“That could take a bit of time to find out,” Ethel replied.

“Why?” asked Enid, trying to keep her temper under control.

“It looks as if it came from Maud,” said Ethel.

“But?” asked Enid.

“The signal didn’t originate from there, it was bounced in from elsewhere,” Ethel replied, hoping that Enid would understand.

“So someone sent the mushroom sandwich to Maud’s kitchen and then on to Myrtle?” asked Enid.

“It looks like it has bounced several times,” Ethel replied.

“So you have to follow the bounces back to find out where the mushroom sandwich came from?” asked Enid.

“That’s right,” said Ethel trying not to heave a sigh of relief.

“And the collection?” Enid asked. “Did that go out via an equally torturous route?”

“No,” said Ethel.

“Can it be traced?” asked Enid.

“Can what be traced?” asked the investigator, the sound of his voice made both Enid and Ethel jump.

“The plate that the mushroom sandwich was on and the mug that the hot chocolate was in,” said Ethel.

“Alleged mushroom sandwich and hot chocolate,” the investigator corrected her.

“If Myrtle says she had a mushroom sandwich and some hot chocolate, then I believe her,” snapped Enid. “There is no alleging about it.”

“To be accurate,” said the investigator. “The alleging is in the origins of the sandwich and beverage rather than it’s presence in the rooms.”

“If we locate the plate and mug there may be residue of what was in them that put Myrtle into a coma,” said Ethel.

“Yes,” agreed the investigator. “Then again, it has been six weeks, there may be nothing left.”

“But if we send them to your lab, they can see what is or is not on them,” said Ethel.

“That would be helpful,” said the investigator. “But it may not tell us where they came from,” he added as his phone rang.

“What is it?” he asked.

“A bag with a dirty plate and mug has arrived in the lab, with a label on it saying for your attention,” he was told.

“That will be it,” said Ethel.

“Thank-you,” the investigator replied. “I’d better get over there. If there is anything else you find.”

“Like where they came from?” asked Ethel.

“That would be useful,” said the investigator.

“I will send the information and the trail over to your lab,” said Ethel.

“I shall leave you to carry on your search,” said the investigator, Ethel and Enid watched as he left the room.

“Why didn’t you bring them back here?” asked Enid.

“One, there is nothing we could do with them and two, it is the trail of evidence, if we brought it back here there was a risk that someone might say that we tampered with it,” said Ethel.

“And is that the same with anything else you might find?” asked Enid.

“Yes,” said Ethel. “Everything has to be above board and beyond suspicion, who ever did this needs to be caught and I don’t want to give them any wriggle room whatsoever.”

“But,” Enid started.

“If you try to intervene, then things start to get muddy and that will cast doubt on the evidence,” said Ethel.

“Don’t you want to sort these people out?” snapped Enid.

“I want them to suffer for what they’ve done, but I don’t want to risk ending up in prison with them. They broke the law and the law deals with them,” Ethel explained.

“But,” Enid started again.

“The best thing to do, for Myrtle, is to make sure they get caught,” said Ethel. “And caught in such a way that they can’t wriggle out of it.”

“OK,” said Enid. “Is there anything I can do?”

“You could talk to Maud,” Ethel suggested. “But don’t blame her for it, whatever you do. She’s an innocent party in this as were all the other people in the chain.”

“So what will she know that is of any use?” Enid replied.

“Someone knew that Myrtle liked fried mushroom sandwiches and hot chocolate,” said Ethel. “You could ask if anyone had been asking about something like that.”

“I suppose so,” sighed Enid, giving her wand a quick wave and getting to the canteen, she expected to see it bustling with customers, but instead there was silence and the shutters were down. Enid knocked on the door hoping to get a response.

“We’re shut,” came a voice from within. “I would have thought the shutters would make that obvious.”

“I’d like to talk to Maud,” Enid replied.

“She isn’t talking to anyone,” came the reply, rather too quickly.

“I’m not anyone, I am Enid,” she snapped back. “So I suggest you go and tell her that I want to talk to her.”

“Of course,” the voice sighed. “I wouldn’t hold much hope in her coming though,” she was told and she heard as footsteps disappeared into the back of the building. Five minutes later someone, wearing an apron, walked round the side of the building.

“You Enid?” she asked.

“Yes,” Enid replied.

“Come this way, she’ll talk to you, but don’t expect much sense.”

Maud was in a yard at the back of the building, sitting on a tree stump, barely recognisable. She was a mess, it didn’t look as if she’d changed her clothes or even washed in weeks and her hair was coated in flour and god knows what else.

“I’m so sorry,” she said, not even looking at Enid.

“For what?” asked Enid.

“The mushroom sandwich and hot chocolate,” said Maud, bursting into tears.

“Why, you didn’t send them,” said Enid.

“But they came from here,” Maud sobbed.

“They were bounced from several places, Ethel is trying to trace where they started from, this was just the last in a whole string of places,” said Enid. “This was not your fault and if Myrtle hadn’t been so tired she’d have know you wouldn’t just send a sandwich and some hot chocolate, you’d bring them to her.”

“It’s good of you to say that, but I still feel responsible,” said Maud.

“Well, you aren’t, but you might be able to help us trace who is,” said Enid.

“If there’s anything I can do,” said Maud, looking up. “Just name it.”

“First, has anyone been asking questions about what sort of foods Myrtle likes?” asked Enid.

“No one I can think of, but they wouldn’t really have to ask, Myrtle doesn’t tend to hide what she thinks of her food, she always says that we make the best fried mushrooms sandwiches ever,” Maud replied with a sob.

“So anyone could have heard her,” sighed Enid. “Then again, the usual crowd would know that anyway. Were there any strangers in the place.”

“Strangers,” said Maud. “Now I think of it, there was a couple of people that I didn’t recognise, they were eating here for a week before,” she paused for a moment to steady her voice. “Haven’t seen them since.”

“Do you have any cctv footage from then?” asked Enid.

“Do you think it was them?” Maud asked.

“I don’t know, but it is something to look into,” Enid replied.

“I’ll find the recordings and get them through to Ethel,” Maud replied.

“There is an investigator looking into things,” Enid explained. “It might be an idea if you give the originals to him and point out the couple.”

“Would you like me to send a copy to Ethel?” Maud asked. “Purely for the records.”

“Of course, the records must be kept up to date,” Enid replied.

“Would it be possible for me to see Myrtle?” Maud asked.

“Of course, you can drop the recordings off with the investigator whilst you are at it,” Enid smiled. “And tell Myrtle the latest news.”

“She’s awake?” asked Maud.

“Yes, woke up about an hour ago, she’ll be getting board by the time you get there, you can give her something to think about,” Enid smiled.

“It would be so good to talk to her,” said Myrtle.

“Then we’d better sort through the recordings and you can get on with it,” Enid smiled.

“Thank-you,” said Maud. “When I think about what could have happened,” she stopped with a sob.

“But it didn’t,” said Enid rather quickly.


By Janice Nye © 2020


“Like where they came from?” asked Ethel.

“That would be useful,” said the investigator.

“I will send the information and the trail over to your lab,” said Ethel.

“I shall leave you to carry on your search,” said the investigator, Ethel and Enid watched as he left the room.

“Why didn’t you bring them back here?” asked Enid.

“One, there is nothing we could do with them and two, it is the trail of evidence, if we brought it back here there was a risk that someone might say that we tampered with it,” said Ethel.

“And is that the same with anything else you might find?” asked Enid.

“Yes,” said Ethel. “Everything has to be above board and beyond suspicion, who ever did this needs to be caught and I don’t want to give them any wriggle room whatsoever.”

“But,” Enid started.

“If you try to intervene, then things start to get muddy and that will cast doubt on the evidence,” said Ethel.

“Don’t you want to sort these people out?” snapped Enid.

“I want them to suffer for what they’ve done, but I don’t want to risk ending up in prison with them. They broke the law and the law deals with them,” Ethel explained.

“But,” Enid started again.

“The best thing to do, for Myrtle, is to make sure they get caught,” said Ethel. “And caught in such a way that they can’t wriggle out of it.”

“OK,” said Enid. “Is there anything I can do?”

“You could talk to Maud,” Ethel suggested. “But don’t blame her for it, whatever you do. She’s an innocent party in this as were all the other people in the chain.”

“So what will she know that is of any use?” Enid replied.

“Someone knew that Myrtle liked fried mushroom sandwiches and hot chocolate,” said Ethel. “You could ask if anyone had been asking about something like that.”

“I suppose so,” sighed Enid, giving her wand a quick wave and getting to the canteen, she expected to see it bustling with customers, but instead there was silence and the shutters were down. Enid knocked on the door hoping to get a response.

“We’re shut,” came a voice from within. “I would have thought the shutters would make that obvious.”

“I’d like to talk to Maud,” Enid replied.

“She isn’t talking to anyone,” came the reply, rather too quickly.

“I’m not anyone, I am Enid,” she snapped back. “So I suggest you go and tell her that I want to talk to her.”

“Of course,” the voice sighed. “I wouldn’t hold much hope in her coming though,” she was told and she heard as footsteps disappeared into the back of the building. Five minutes later someone, wearing an apron, walked round the side of the building.

“You Enid?” she asked.

“Yes,” Enid replied.

“Come this way, she’ll talk to you, but don’t expect much sense.”

Maud was in a yard at the back of the building, sitting on a tree stump, barely recognisable. She was a mess, it didn’t look as if she’d changed her clothes or even washed in weeks and her hair was coated in flour and god knows what else.

“I’m so sorry,” she said, not even looking at Enid.

“For what?” asked Enid.

“The mushroom sandwich and hot chocolate,” said Maud, bursting into tears.

“Why, you didn’t send them,” said Enid.

“But they came from here,” Maud sobbed.

“They were bounced from several places, Ethel is trying to trace where they started from, this was just the last in a whole string of places,” said Enid. “This was not your fault and if Myrtle hadn’t been so tired she’d have know you wouldn’t just send a sandwich and some hot chocolate, you’d bring them to her.”

“It’s good of you to say that, but I still feel responsible,” said Maud.

“Well, you aren’t, but you might be able to help us trace who is,” said Enid.

“If there’s anything I can do,” said Maud, looking up. “Just name it.”

“First, has anyone been asking questions about what sort of foods Myrtle likes?” asked Enid.

“No one I can think of, but they wouldn’t really have to ask, Myrtle doesn’t tend to hide what she thinks of her food, she always says that we make the best fried mushrooms sandwiches ever,” Maud replied with a sob.

“So anyone could have heard her,” sighed Enid. “Then again, the usual crowd would know that anyway. Were there any strangers in the place.”

“Strangers,” said Maud. “Now I think of it, there was a couple of people that I didn’t recognise, they were eating here for a week before,” she paused for a moment to steady her voice. “Haven’t seen them since.”

“Do you have any cctv footage from then?” asked Enid.

“Do you think it was them?” Maud asked.

“I don’t know, but it is something to look into,” Enid replied.

“I’ll find the recordings and get them through to Ethel,” Maud replied.

“There is an investigator looking into things,” Enid explained. “It might be an idea if you give the originals to him and point out the couple.”

“Would you like me to send a copy to Ethel?” Maud asked. “Purely for the records.”

“Of course, the records must be kept up to date,” Enid replied.

“Would it be possible for me to see Myrtle?” Maud asked.

“Of course, you can drop the recordings off with the investigator whilst you are at it,” Enid smiled. “And tell Myrtle the latest news.”

“She’s awake?” asked Maud.

“Yes, woke up about an hour ago, she’ll be getting board by the time you get there, you can give her something to think about,” Enid smiled.

“It would be so good to talk to her,” said Myrtle.

“Then we’d better sort through the recordings and you can get on with it,” Enid smiled.

“Thank-you,” said Maud. “When I think about what could have happened,” she stopped with a sob.

“But it didn’t,” said Enid rather quickly.


By Janice Nye © 2020



Wednesday, 28 October 2020

The Fairy Godmother Part 88


You would think that it would just require a wave of the wand and I’d be in the hospital, after all, I just have to do that to get anywhere, but it doesn’t work that way. I think that a few years back there were a lot of people sent to the hospital, via a wand, and they collided, some people ended up with the wrong body parts, some were missing a few important bits, heads, that sort of thing. I don’t think they ever worked out how many had been sent there, all I do know is that only half a dozen had all their own bits and five of them were dead before they were sent, since then it has been forbidden. Hence Enid ringing for an ambulance, unfortunately they haven’t got it properly organised yet, which is why I was coming round when they arrived.

“What happened?” the ambulance man asked.

“I don’t know,” I told them. “I went to bed and woke up lying here on the floor and every time I try to get up everything goes dark again.”

“Who rang for us?” he asked.

“I did,” snapped Enid. “I was checking up on my daughter and I found her like this.”

“Did you hear anything?” he asked.

“Of course not, I was fifty miles away,” snapped Enid.

“And you came to check up on her?” he asked.

“I thought there was something wrong, I was worried about her and rightly so,” said Enid.

“Shouldn’t you be checking me to make sure I’m OK or taking me to the hospital or something?” I asked, feeling a bit left out of the discussion.

“We are just trying to find out how you ended up down there,” the ambulance man replied. “Assuming, that is, that you don’t normally sleep on the floor.”

“If I did there would be no purpose to me having a bed,” I said.

“Nor would I have rung you,” Enid added.

“The pool of blood under the patients head is growing,” said the paramedic.

“I was wondering when someone was going to notice that,” said the ambulance man.

“Would someone kindly do something about it,” I said and then things went dark again. Next thing I remember I was waking up in a hospital bed with a splitting headache.

“You’re awake,” said Enid, pressing a button on the bedside cabinet.

“I think so,” I replied with a wince.

“You are so useless,” snapped Enid. “I would have thought even you would be able to tell if you were awake!”

“I hope I wouldn’t dream a headache this bad,” I replied wincing as I tried to sit up.

“How many times must I tell you not to move,” snapped Enid, pressing the button again. “They said if you wake up to press this, what’s the point if they don’t respond.”

“What do you mean if?” I asked.

“You have been like this for six weeks,” she said looking at her watch.

“Have you been here all that time?” I asked.

“Of course not, I’ve got to sleep, we, your family and friends, set up a rota, it’s just chance that I was here now,” Enid said, but the bags under her eyes told a different story.

“Ah, so the sleeping beauty has woken up at last,” said a cheerful looking man in a white coat with a stethoscope draped round his neck.

“I was debating that with my Mother,” I replied.

“And how do we feel?” he asked.

“Well, Mum looks like she hast slept for ages, I have a splitting headache and I’m assuming you can speak for yourself,” I replied, trying to take account of all the people in the room.

“So you are the comedian of the family,” he replied, his face fell slightly as Mum rushed out of the room sobbing.

“I think Enid may be a bit over tired,” said a nurse, whom I hadn’t noticed. “She has been at Myrtle’s side since she was brought in six weeks ago.”

“I don’t know why she would be upset, being awake is a good sign,” he said. “Could you get her something for her headache nurse?”

“Yes Doctor,” the nurse replied.

“So, how are you feeling?” he asked me.

“I have a headache,” I replied.

“And apart from that?” he asked.

“I’d like to know why I am here,” I said, trying to get my thoughts together.

“You have had a rather nasty blow to the head and going by the test results, you have been eating the wrong type of mushrooms,” he said. “Do you remember when you last ate mushrooms?”

“I had a fried mushroom sandwich just before I went to bed,” I replied.

“Is that all?” he asked.

“And a mug of hot chocolate,” I added.

“There was no evidence of anything having been cooked,” said a strange voice.

“Who are you?” I asked.

“I am the person in charge of finding out what happened to you,” he said. “If you could tell me what happened, in the right order,” he said pulling a notebook out of his pocket.

“I was hungry, so I looked through the cupboards to see what I could find, in the way of food,” I said.

“And that is when you found the mushrooms and decided to fry them?” he asked.

“No,” I replied. “That is when I found that there was no food in the flat.”

“So where did the mushrooms come from?” he asked.

“They appeared, as a hot fired mushroom sandwich, on a plate, on the work surface with a message from Maud,” I replied.

“Maud?” he asked.

“She runs the canteen,” I replied.

“And she has a habit of sending you hot fried mushroom sandwiches?” he asked.

“No, but she is a kind person and she knows that I have been working hard lately,” I replied.

“So it didn’t come as a surprise to find this sandwich appearing?” he asked.

“Not at the time,” I replied.

“But now?” he asked.

“Now I think back, she would have delivered it herself, not just sent it,” I replied.

“So who do you think sent it?” he asked.

“I don’t know,” I replied. “But I think I know someone who could find out.”

“Ethel?” said Enid, returning to my bedside.

“And who are you?” asked the investigator.

“I am her Mother,” Enid replied in her most imperial of manor.

“I see,” he replied. “And your name is?”

“Enid,” she snapped.

“We have had our best tech people trying to find out about everything coming in and our of your rooms and found out nothing,” he said. “I don’t think this Ethel will be able to find out anything that we can’t.”

“Ethel works in the office of the Fairy Godmother,” I explained. “She knows all about the techie stuff that we use and if anyone can trace how that mushroom sandwich and mug of hot chocolate got there and where it came from, it would be her.”

“We have the best tech people working for us,” he blustered.

“Mum, will you go and ask Ethel?” I asked Enid.

“Of course,” Enid replied. “Take care, I wont be long,” she added walking out of the room and out of the building,so that she could clear the wand deadening field.

“I don’t think that is going to be much help,” the investigator replied.

“I think we should judge that when we get the results back,” I replied, resting my head back on the pillows.

“I think the patient is tired,” said the Doctor.

“I only have a few more questions,” the investigator replied.

“Could you tell the Easter bunny that I will sort out the Easter egg supply tomorrow, I’m feeling a little bit woozy and he won’t listen to me,” I said to the Doctor, I’ll explain it all to the Easter bunny later, he’s very understanding, I’m sure he’ll understand.

“No more questions,” said the Doctor firmly. “I don’t think you’d get any sensible answers from her anyway.”

“I shall be back later,” said the investigator. “Could you let me know if her Mother or Ethel turn up, I would like to speak to them as well.”

“Of course,” said the Doctor, guiding him out of the room.


By Janice Nye © 2020


Monday, 26 October 2020

The Fairy Godmother Part 87


My rooms were quiet, once everyone was gone and I liked it that way. I wondered round trying to find something to clean and or tidy, but there wasn’t anything. I decided to make a mess of the kitchen by cooking myself something for tea. There was no food in the larder, probably something to do with me not doing the shopping.

“Looks like it’s going to be the canteen for me then,” I thought, yawning loudly. A fried mushroom sandwich appeared on the counter, still steaming, along with a message.

“I heard that thought and the yawn, eat this and have a rest, Maud.”

“Thank-you,” I thought as loudly as I could and sat down to eat it. I was just trying to work out what to drink when a mug of hot chocolate appeared.

“You read my mind,” I thought, yawning. The plate and mug vanished as soon as I had finished and I went off to my bedroom with the thought that I would wake up to a nice clean and tidy kitchen which required restocking with food.

I climbed into bed and closed my eyes and suddenly I was at a fair ground, except all the rides were run by clowns who were carrying large bunches of balloons.

“You should have a go on this ride,” a clown insisted, pushing me into the seat and fastening me securely in place. I was just about to protest when the ride started. I thought it was one where you travelled round in a circle and the seat went up and down getting faster as you went, but this one seemed to wander round the fairground weaving in and out of the other rides as it went, then it twisted and I fell off, landing in a large net full of balls.

“This is strictly for children under the height of five foot tall,” said the clown dragging me out of the net by my hair.

“I am four foot nine,” I said, trying to disentangle my hair from his grip.

“But you are over 12 years old,” he said flinging me away from the net full of balls. I landed in a large tea cup.

“I would advise you to get out of that quickly,” said someone who looked like the mad hatter from “Alice in Wonderland”. “The tea is brewing and we will be pouring it out shortly. It would be a shame for that pretty white dress to be covered with tea stains,” he smiled as a leapt out of the cup. I would have waved my wand, but I couldn’t find it, some things are never there when you want them. I was slightly disappointed when he didn’t pour tea into the mug that I had climbed out of, instead he poured it into a rather nice tea set.

“Would you like a cup?” he asked

“Yes, that would be nice,” I said. He handed me an empty cup.

“What about the tea?” I asked. He emptied the teapot over my head, laughed and ran off, fortunately the tea was cold, I suspected that it had never been even warm. I threw the tea cup after him, with little expectation of actually hitting, but it made contact with his head and he stopped dead and fell flat on his face. All the clowns around me turned round to face me.

“You’ve killed him,” they all said, not bothering to take into account the fact that the mad hatter had just rolled over onto his side, picked up the tea cup and started eating it.

“He isn’t dead,” I said pointing to him. He finished the tea cup, leapt up, put a Police helmet on his head, pulled a pair of handcuffs out of his pocket, grabbed my right wrist, turned me round and cuffed my hands behind my back.

“You are under arrest,” he said.

“Shouldn’t you caution me?” I asked.

“Look where you are walking, there are some nasty holes in the ground,” he laughed as I fell through one and started plummeting through the sky in a landscape that looked like a picture from a children’s book all block pastel colours.

“This has to be a dream,” I told myself as a wrestled with the handcuffs.

“You should think the cuffs large and you small,” came a voice from nowhere. I did and the cuffs fell off, I flapped my wings and missed the ground by a matter of inches.

“You are a fairy, these things shouldn’t be a problem,” said the voice.

“What the hell is going on?” I thought.

“Now now, Fairies shouldn’t use language like that,” the voice replied laughing.

“Who are you, where are we and why don’t you show yourself?” I asked.

“You are a fairy godmother, you should have all the answers, why don’t you tell me,” came the reply.

“What makes you think that I have all the answers, just because I am a fairy godmother?” I asked, settling myself on a lollipop shaped tree.

“How can you provide the solutions if you don’t have the answers?” the voice replied. I was about to say that it was rude to answer a question with a question, when it crossed my mind that it wouldn’t get us anywhere.

“I know the questions, if you know the right questions then you will get the right answers and that will solve the problem,” I replied.

“Do you have all the questions?” the voice asked.

“I doubt if anyone does, but hopefully I have enough questions to start unravelling the problem,” I replied. “So, where am I and who are you?”

“Like I said, find out and I’ll tell you,” said the voice laughing, then I heard a door shut and the laughter was cut off as if the laughing person had gone through a door and it had shut behind them.

“I shall follow that road and see where it leads to,” I thought spying a road that lead into the distance. “After all, I am going to get nowhere sitting up this tree, it isn’t even comfortable.”

The light from the sun, shinning through my bedroom window, woke me up. I was lying on the floor next to my bed. I tried to stand up, but my head started throbbing.

“You just stay right where you are,” said Enid. “I’ve rung for an ambulance, they say you shouldn’t move, there’s a nasty cut on your head and they don’t want to risk you moving in case you have injured your back.”

“What happened?” I asked, trying to work out how to ask what she was doing there without sounding ungrateful.

“I don’t know,” said Enid. “Maud asked me to drop by to check up on you, you haven’t done any shopping lately, she thought you might be low on food.”

“She sent me a fried mushroom sandwich last night and some hot chocolate,” I said.

“Maud my be good, kind and considerate,” said Enid, looking like she was going to be sick. “But she does not do deliveries to anyone, not like that. She might take food to someone, but she wont send it unannounced.”

“She did yesterday,” I insisted.

“So where is the plate and mug?” Enid asked.

“They vanished, when I finished,” I replied and winced at the sound of someone hammering on my door.

“That will be the ambulance people,” said Enid. “You stay here, I’ll let them in.”

“Do I get any choice with that?” I thought as the world went dark.


By Janice Nye © 2020